Wednesday, 16 May 2018

Torn Between Two Worlds: Science and Religion by Shawn Murphy


Hello readers,

I would like to thank Booktasters NonFiction and Shawn Murphy for giving me a copy of this ebook for free in exchange for a honest review.

This short book caught my interest because if I’m honest it’s an age-old argument in my family, also getting a fresh insight into a different point of view on science and religion is worth a look. I grew up around religion although I wasn't battered over the head with it and was allowed to make my own choices as i got older.

I found it a relatively easy book to read and found it pretty well researched and referenced. There wasn’t really anything that I personally found offensive or too different from what I believe or had an understanding of.  Murphy mentions he was hesitant to write this book I understand as to why as there is a very fine balance that needs to be found when writing about either religion or science, but I would urge you to read this, it is a window into something more than what we are taught, also what harm can be done looking into a different insight to your own you can either learn something or discover how much you believe in your own beliefs. 

Murphy states that you must study the physical sciences to understand the natural laws and explains through the book the fundamental differences between the scientist & the philosopher, while in his opinion a philosopher needs to be a scientist first.

This is the first book in the Torn Between Two Worlds trilogy, Murphy argues that science and religion must come together to answer three important questions that we still don’t solidly have an answer too….
    Where did we come from?
    Why are we here?
    Where are we going?


Murphy believes that these questions are unanswerable by the religions of the world alone and that science can help answer these questions. Murphy's research allows him to take from the works of Socrates, Plato and others, to come to the conclusion that these two seemingly irreconcilable fields don't make sense unless they are understood together. He also outlines the historical influences that have led to the separation of these once collaborative forces.

I honestly think the book is worth a read and people should not be discouraged from reading this book and the other two books in the trilogy. The information presented is interesting and brings up topics that we don’t tend to think about as critically as we should. I am going to repeat myself because it is worth mentioning again what harm can be done looking into a different insight to your own you can either learn something or discover how much you believe in your own beliefs. 

L x

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